Philmont: The M & M Game



Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 11:59:31 -0800
From: "Jason A. Cotting" <p2ranger@mail.com>
Subject: [Philmont] M&M game

The participants sit in a circle. Each participant gets about a handful of M&M's. Each color means a different thing that is to be shared with the group:

Red - tell one good thing about the person on your right.
Yellow - tell one good thing about the person on your left
Orange - if you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be
Green - if you had one wish, what would it be
Brown - tell one thing you have learned from nature

(I can't remember what the blue M&M does. It seems like when I did it last was before they had the blue ones. I'll ask around and see about it.)

Each participant takes turns going around the cirlce picking a color. Once that participant has chosen one color, he/she can eat all of M&M's of that color that he/she has. It goes on until everyone has gone through each color

I only did this with my Mountain Trek crews because it takes time to know the people in your crew before it becomes effective. Being that a ranger leaves regular crews on day 4, there isn't enough time for the crew to have bonded. So don't expect your Ranger to do this or know about it. So bring your own bag of M&M's.

Jason
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Ranger


Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 08:53:14 -0800 From: "Jason A. Cotting" <p2ranger@mail.com> Subject: RE: [Philmont] M&M game
That was it, thanks Brian. I remember now. Blue is for the acomplishment they are proud of. Most of the time it was finishing the trek :-)

Jason
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Subject: Re: [Philmont] M&M game
From: "Brian Gannon" <bgannon@vt.edu>
Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 18:59:03 -0800
I too often used this game with crews - it is very effective, especially with Mountain Treks. For the blue M&Ms, I had the participant share the one accomplishment in their life that they were most proud of.

-Brian


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