New Mexico Trip


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From           Douglas Irwin <scout@mickey.ultranet.com>
Organization   UltraNet Communications, Inc.
Date           Fri, 07 Feb 1997 02:36:51 -0800
Newsgroups     rec.scouting.usa
Message-ID     <32FB05C3.9C1@mickey.ultranet.com>

My son is going to Philmont in July.  So my wife and I have decided to
to make a family trip out of it.  We will be flying into the area on
Saturday, dropping my son off on Sunday and spending the week touring
the area with our other son (STAR Scout).  Any comments on the following
questions would be appreaciated:

1.  We heard that camp stove can not be flown, se we may have to buy a
stove and fuel then dispose of it prior to flying back.  If this is so,
we would like to donate the stove to a local troop.  EMAIL me and we can
make some arraingemnts.

2.  We have never been in this area, are there any camping suggestions. 
We have been told to watch out for the scorpions.  How do you deal with
this kind of problem when tent camping.

3.  We know we might want to drive to ghe Grand Canyon, but what else
should we not miss while in the area.

4.  I will visit the Philmont Trading Post, but are there any good Scout
stores in the area for patches, and different kinds of resources.


I may think of other questions as time goes by, but this will do for
now.


YIS

Doug Irwin
Troop 4, Lakeville, MA

Re: New Mexico Trip


From           shenning@fast.net (Stephen M. Henning)
Organization   Boy Scouts of America
Date           Sun, 09 Feb 1997 13:59:44 -0500
Newsgroups     rec.scouting.usa
Message-ID     <shenning-0902971359450001@ppp-abe-514.fast.net>

In article <32FB05C3.9C1@mickey.ultranet.com>, scout@mickey.ultranet.com wrote:

> 1.  We heard that camp stove can not be flown, se we may have to buy a
> stove and fuel then dispose of it prior to flying back.  If this is so,
> we would like to donate the stove to a local troop.  EMAIL me and we can
> make some arraingemnts.

You can not fly a used camp stove or used fuel bottles.  We were able to
thoroughly clean and vent our stoves and fuel bottles and take them on the
plane.  There can be no odor of fuel and nothing can be sealed since that
concentrates the fumes.

> 2.  We have never been in this area, are there any camping suggestions. 
> We have been told to watch out for the scorpions.  How do you deal with
> this kind of problem when tent camping.

They are the same kind of a problem as snakes and spiders are here in the
northeast.  You do not lay clothing and shoes where something uninvited
can climb in.  I use a tent with a zipper and a floor.

> 3.  We know we might want to drive to ghe Grand Canyon, but what else
> should we not miss while in the area.

The canyonlands areas of Arizona, Utah, and Colorado are beautiful
but in general are desolate and remote.

Grand Canyon National Park has camping and lodge accommodations on the rim and
camping and motel villages at the south entrance and to some extent at the east
entrance.  The main activity is touring the rim and traveling to the
bottom if you are adventuresome.  The east rim is open to cars, but
the west rim is only open to the rim bus (at least in the summer).

Between Grand Canyon and Zion is Pipe Spring national monument.
It is a historic park with Winsor Castle, a fort built in 1870 at
Pipe Spring, a very stable source of water.  If you have time
make a quick stop.  There is no food or lodging near by.

Zion National Park is very different and much nicer for hiking or
swimming since camping and the lodge is in the bottom of the canyon.  It has the
park lodge, camping and many motels nearby at the entrance.

Cedar Breaks National Monument is between Zion and Bryce and is worth
a visit.  It is a beautiful sight.  It has alpine meadows, and a very
photogenic natural amphitheater resembling Bryce.  It has only a visitors
center.  There is no restaurant or lodging in or near the park.  Brian
Head is the nearest town ( a ski resort ) with food and rooms.

Bryce Canyon National Park is a beautiful park with lots of trails.
It is fairly desolate but very beautiful. It has camping and a lodge and
dining room. There is Ruby's place near by that is a motel/restaurant 
complex which is worth a stop even if you don't stay there.

From Bryce you can go to Capitol Reef National Park.  I personally feel
it is the least interesting Park in the area but does have some
nice hikes, and petroglyphs that are interesting.  It has a visitors
center but no food, camping and or lodging.  It is located in a very
remote area.

The next attraction is Natural Bridges National Monument with 3 natural
bridges which are quite interesting.  It has a visitors center but no
food, camping and  or lodging.  It is located in a very remote area.

Next you have Canyonlands National Park.  It is near Monticello and
Moab, which for Utah are bustling towns with camping and several motels and
restaurants.  The Canyonlands is best viewed from Dead Horse Point
Overlook in Dead Horse State Park near Moab.  Many people mistake
our pictures of Canyonlands for the Grand Canyon. It is very similar
but much more accessible.  It has no facilities in the park and the
visitors center is in Moab.  It is quite time consuming to explore.
I would recommend Dead Horse Point Overlook.

Also near Moab is Arches National Park which has over 200 natural
arches ranging from 3 foot to over 100 foot in span.  They are
quite photogenic.  You enter the park at the visitors center.  There
is no food or lodging in the park. It consists of about a 15 mile 
drive past the arches and hiking trails.  You return over the same
route.  It is very desolate.

To the east we have Mesa Verde National Park with its world famous
cliff dwellings which are remarkably preserved for being over 1000
years old.  Many are open to visitors.  It has camping and a lodge and 
restaurant in the park.  It is near Cortez, another bustling town with 
motels and restaurants.

North of Cortez is Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Monument with
a very stark gorge carved by the Gunnison.  It has a visitors center
and some short hiking trails.  There is no food or lodging.  We saw
a bald eagle soaring near the rim of the canyon very near us. The
city of Montrose is 15 miles away.

North of Montrose is Colorado National Monument interesting formations
but rates near Capitol Reef in comparison to the others.  It has
some nice hiking trails.  It has a visitors center but no food or
lodging.  It is near I-70 and is quite accessible.  If you are traveling
on I-70 make sure you drive through.

Between Colorado National Monument and Denver is Aspen, Vail, Teluride,
and Breckenridge which are basically ski resorts but are also fun in the
off season.

Near Denver are many attractions including Rocky Mountain National Park,
Royal Gorge, Red Rocks, and Central City.

Between Denver and Philmont take a side trip to La Junta Colorado and the
Koshare museum and kiva. (1-800-693-KIVA).

All of the parks and monuments have camping so I did not mention that.
There are great books that describe camp grounds and lodges in national
and state parks.  We found AAA or Mobil guides good for motels and lodges.
We had reservations in the national parks but just reserved our motels
a day ahead as be went along.

> 4.  I will visit the Philmont Trading Post, but are there any good Scout
> stores in the area for patches, and different kinds of resources.

There are 3 trading posts at Philmont.  The main one is at HQ where the
treks start and end.  Across the street is the Seton museum which as a
great gift shop, many books and some patches.  Near the Seton museum is
the adult Training Center with its trading post.  Be sure to visit the
Seton Museum, Villa Philmonte in the training center,  and Kit Carson
museum.  The Koshare museum and kiva at La Junta have a lot of patches and
gift items.

-- 
Cheers, Steve Henning, Reading, Pennsylvania, USA
http://www.users.fast.net/~shenning

Re: New Mexico Trip


From           palisade@ionet.net
Organization   ioNET
Date           Mon, 17 Feb 1997 18:35:32 GMT
Newsgroups     rec.scouting.usa
Message-ID     <5ea1dp$8h9@ionews.ionet.net>

Douglas Irwin <scout@mickey.ultranet.com> wrote:

>My son is going to Philmont in July.  So my wife and I have decided to
>to make a family trip out of it.  We will be flying into the area on
>Saturday, dropping my son off on Sunday and spending the week touring
>the area with our other son (STAR Scout).  Any comments on the following
>questions would be appreaciated:

>1.  We heard that camp stove can not be flown, se we may have to buy a
>stove and fuel then dispose of it prior to flying back.  If this is so,
>we would like to donate the stove to a local troop.  EMAIL me and we can
>make some arraingemnts.

I think you can ship stoves via UPS or the like.  CHeck out that
option as well.

>2.  We have never been in this area, are there any camping suggestions. 
>We have been told to watch out for the scorpions.  How do you deal with
>this kind of problem when tent camping.

In ten years of employment during the summers I have never seen a
scorpion at or near Philmont.  I cant vouch for most of the rest of
New Mexico.  Once I saw a rattlesnake.  Your greatest concern is with
food and other smellables attracting bears.  Hang these items or keep
them in the vehicle.

>3.  We know we might want to drive to ghe Grand Canyon, but what else
>should we not miss while in the area.

In the immediate vacinity you will find the towns of Cimarron, Red
River, Taos, and Santa Fe.

Cimarron:  Not much here.  Sorry.  Look for the Art Gallery on the
north side of 51.  The Kree-Mee and Burrito Banquet on the south.
Fish the Cimarron River.  The Valle Vidal is north of the Ranch and
might be interesting ask around the locals and Philmont Staff will
give you more info.

Red River:  Summer time in a ski town.  Trinkets and good food.
Roller skating, go-karts, and minature golf.  Or hike Wheeler Peak.

Taos: Historical art colony.  A range of tourista attractions, food,
and good to great art.  Find Bent Street off the square or the skull
or teepee stores on the way to Santa Fe.  The Laughing Horse is a
great B&B north of the village.

Santa Fe:  Here my knowledge runs thin.  Like a bigger Taos with
higher class and price art and curios.

>4.  I will visit the Philmont Trading Post, but are there any good Scout
>stores in the area for patches, and different kinds of resources.

Not really.  Definately see the Villa.  Schedule the tour at the Seton
Museum.

>I may think of other questions as time goes by, but this will do for
>now.


>YIS

>Doug Irwin
>Troop 4, Lakeville, MA



Re: New Mexico Trip


From           "Gary L. Jensen" <gjensen@sysdiv.sdl.usu.edu>
Date           Thu, 20 Feb 1997 09:01:34 +0000
Newsgroups     rec.scouting.usa
Message-ID     <330C12EE.5714@sysdiv.sdl.usu.edu>

palisade@ionet.net wrote:
> 
> Douglas Irwin <scout@mickey.ultranet.com> wrote:
> 
> >My son is going to Philmont in July.  So my wife and I have decided to
> >to make a family trip out of it.  We will be flying into the area on
> >Saturday, dropping my son off on Sunday and spending the week touring
> >the area with our other son (STAR Scout).  Any comments on the following
> >questions would be appreaciated:
> 
> >1.  We heard that camp stove can not be flown, se we may have to buy a
> >stove and fuel then dispose of it prior to flying back.  If this is so,
> >we would like to donate the stove to a local troop.  EMAIL me and we can
> >make some arraingemnts.
> 


The latest issue of Backpacker Magazine (the annual gear issue) 
has an informative section on flying with stoves.

Gary Jensen
Team 1301
Logan UT

Re: New Mexico Trip


From           rstone@acca.nmsu.edu (Richard Stone)
Organization   New Mexico State University
Date           26 Feb 97 19:01:17 +0500
Newsgroups     rec.scouting.usa
Message-ID     <2244.6996T1141T880@acca.nmsu.edu>

> My son is going to Philmont in July.  So my wife and I
> have decided to to make a family trip out of it.  We will
> be flying into the area on Saturday, dropping my son off
> on Sunday and spending the week touring the area with our
> other son (STAR Scout).  Any comments on the following
> questions would be appreaciated:

> 3.  We know we might want to drive to ghe Grand Canyon,
> but what else should we not miss while in the area.

Since you'll be here for a while, why not try southern
New Mexico and west Texas.  Check out

Los Alamos.  Interesting town - full of science and history.
Did you know that Los Alamos National Labs was "taken" from
a boy's school that used Scouting as its program?  Check
out the museum.  Nearby is Bandolier National Wilderness
Area.

Albuquerque.  Lots of interesting history and city stuff.
Check out the cable gondola to the top of Sandia Peak.
The Atomic Museum at Kirtland Air Force Base.  REI (for
your camping needs).  Old town (hispanic history of the
area).  Petroglyph National Monument.  The high tech
zone in Rio Rancho.  We have wonderful margueritas here 
too. ;-)

The Rio Grande basin.  Rafting and kayaking in the Taos
area.  Bosque (wetlands and nature preserve) south of 
Albuquerque.  Lakes and irrigation systems.

Soccorro.  The Very Large Array space telescope.

White Sands Missile Range.  Birth of the space program,
and testing grounds of the A-bomb.

White Sands National Monument.  Unique gypsum sand dune
sea.  We do cub klondike derbies there!

Ruidoso.  Apache reservation, casino gambling, horse racing,
tourista stuff.

Lincoln.  Area of the "Lincoln County Wars", where the ranchers
competed for good grazing land, giving rise to many of the
famous outlaws.

Capitan.  Capitan National Forest.  Home and grave of "Smokey
the Bear".

Las Cruces and old Mesilla ("mess-eeah").  "Old Mexico" and
where Billy the Kid and Judge Roy Bean became even more
famous.

Roswell.  UFOs.  Tourists and museums.  UFO festival on 
July 4.

El Paso.  A modern city with Wild West roots.  Across
the river from Juarez, Mexico.  Check out the Warbird
Museum (WW2 airplanes) in Santa Teresa.

Carlsbad and Carlsbad Caverns.  Big Hole.  Camping in area.


Happy Travelling!!


---dRStone


Re: New Mexico Trip


From           standcmr@aol.com
Organization   AOL http://www.aol.com
Date           11 Feb 1997 02:05:17 GMT
Newsgroups     rec.scouting.usa
Message-ID     <19970211020501.VAA01963@ladder01.news.aol.com>

scout@mickey.ultranet.com:
<< 3.  We know we might want to drive to ghe Grand Canyon, but what else
should we not miss while in the area.>>

The dormant (I hope) Capulan Volcano, north and east of Cimarron is an
interesting drive... round and round to a parking place near the top of
the cone... then walk down inside.

<< 4.  I will visit the Philmont Trading Post, but are there any good
Scout
stores in the area for patches, and different kinds of resources.>>

The Cimarron Art Gallery is a must for any Wood Badger or friend of Wood
Badgers.  
And there are some nice shops nearby.

Regards,  
Stan Pope (Lilchpin Elangomat) 
A volunteer Scouter for W.D. Boyce Council, BSA, Peoria, IL
http://members.aol.com/StanDCmr/ with original material on 
Pinewood Derby Design, Conducting Races, US Flag Retirement, 
Pop Bottle Rocket Launcher, and Cub RT Rejuvination.
mailto: standcmr@aol.com, stanpope@juno.comIn article